AnkleSTONE

Foot & Ankle Ailments and Injuries

Here you will find descriptions of several common foot and ankle injuries with short videos demonstrating therapeutic exercises using AnkleSTONE® to relieve pain, strengthen soft tissue and improve flexibility to restore range-of-motion. As a conditioning and strengthening tool, all of the exercises demonstrated in these videos should become part of your daily conditioning regimen to improve and maintain your full range-of-motion and power.
Achilles Ruptures
Achilles Tendinopathy
Achilles Tendon Tears
Achilles Tendonitis
Ankle Impingement Syndrome
Ankle Sprains
Avulsion Fracture
Bone Stress Injuries
Fifth Metatarsal Fracture
High Ankle Sprains
Jones Fracture
Lace Bite
Lateral Ankle Sprains
Metatarsal Fractures
Neuromas
Peroneal Tendon Strain
Plantar Fasciitis
Plantar Fasciopathy
Sesamoiditis
Shin Splints
Stress Fractures

ACHILLES TENDINOPATHY

ACHILLES TENDONITIS

ACHILLES TEDNON TEARS

ACHILLES RUPTURE

PLANTAR FASCIOPATHY

PLANTAR FASCIITIS

ANKLE SPRAINS

LATERAL ANKLE SPRAINS

ANKLE IMPINGEMENT SYNDROME

BONE STRESS INJURIES

JONES FRACTURE

AVULSION FRACTURE

PPERONEAL TENDON STRAIN

NEUROMAS

STRESS FRACTURES

FIFTH METATARSAL FRACTURE

METATARSAL FRACTURES

SESAMOIDITIS

HIGH ANKLE SPRAINS

LACE BITE

SHIN SPLINTS

ACHILLES TENDINOPATHY
Achilles tendinopathy is an overuse condition that causes pain, swelling and stiffness of the Achilles tendon that joins your heel bone to your calf muscles. It is thought to be caused by repeated tiny injuries to the Achilles tendon. It is different than tendinitis which refers to an inflammation of the tendon. Tendinopathy is a condition in which the tendon is at a stage where it begins to deteriorate. Usually this condition will repair itself within 6 months after starting treatment.

ACHILLES TENDONITIS
The Achilles tendon, stretches from the calf muscle to the heel and although it is the strongest tendon in the body, it is prone to overuse injuries. Normal play and moves in many sports and activities place incredible stress on the tendon making it prone to tendonitis. This inflammation of the tendon leads to pain and stiffness in the calf and a limited range of motion.

ACHILLES TEDNON TEARS
The Achilles tendon may also suffer small or large tears. They can occur gradually or suddenly. In a worst-case scenario, the Achilles tendon may rupture completely requiring surgery to repair and a long time to heal and rehabilitate. Once healed, physical therapy can be employed to restore your range of motion.

ACHILLES RUPTURE
Achilles tendon ruptures are common injuries in football and rugby. They are usually non-contact injuries and the result of a lack of flexibility due to inadequate conditioning and over-stretching of the tendon. Both nonoperative treatment and surgical repair are effective, based on the severity of the tear. It’s important to see an orthopedic surgeon if you suspect you’ve sustained this type of injury.

PLANTAR FASCIOPATHY
Plantar Fasciopathy is used to describe a long-term overuse condition or injury of the Plantar Fasciia that causes inflammation. It is a thick band of tissue at the bottom of your foot that runs from your heel to toes. Ultimately it can lead to its deterioration. Symptoms include pain and Stiffness that can be quite debilitating.

PLANTAR FASCIITIS
Plantar Fasciitis is an inflammation of the Plantar Fasciia. It is a thick band of tissue at the bottom of your foot that runs from your heel to toes. It is an injury that can occur all at once due to an accident, fall, sudden impact and overstretching. It can also occur over time progressing due repetitive movement and overuse. It can become debilitating.

ANKLE SPRAINS
Possibly the most common sports injuries are ankle sprains to varying degrees of severity. At some point in an athlete’s career, he or she will experience at least one ankle sprain. When they do occur, proper rehabilitation and conditioning are critical. Studies show that players who have had an ankle sprain are five times more likely to suffer repeat injuries.

LATERAL ANKLE SPRAINSLATERAL ANKLE SPRAINS
Lateral ankle sprains are common injuries among athletes. They may occur from landing awkwardly from a jump or twisting the ankle. They are common in gymnastics and dance.

ANKLE IMPINGEMENT SYNDROME
Ankle Impingement Syndrome may be anterior or posterior (front or back) of the ankle. This injury is the result of bone structures that pinch the soft tissue when the ankle is pointed in one direction or the other. It typically manifests after repeated micro traumas to the ankle and causes pain and discomfort. Your body responds by building extra bone tissue to protect against further injury.

BONE STRESS INJURIES
Bone stress injuries are overuse injuries caused by repeated demanding activities that are transmitting weight onto bones. Running and jogging are examples of these types of activities. Often, athletes don’t allow for adequate recovery periods and as a result, the bones will be unable to withstand the ongoing stress. This results in localized bone pain in the affected area. These injuries are said to account for 10% of all sports related injuries.

JONES FRACTURE
The Jones fracture is common within professional basketball, diagnosed when players break the fifth metatarsal bone.

AVULSION FRACTURE
An avulsion fracture may occur when you sprain your ankle and the ligament or tendon pulls off a small piece of bone. You’ll experience sudden pain, swelling, bruising, and limited mobility.

PPERONEAL TENDON STRAIN
The two peroneal tendons in the foot run side by side behind the outer ankle bone. Peroneal tendon injuries may be sudden caused by trauma or develop over time due repetitive ankle motion and overuse. Players with higher arches are at risk for developing peroneal tendon injuries causing pain and swelling. Peroneal tears cause weakness or instability of the foot and ankle.

NEUROMAS
Neuromas are a benign growth of nerve tissue which are also known as “pinched nerves”. The majority of these those who develop these growths are woman. There are several causes of neuromas but the one that is applicable to the subjects discussed here is repeated stress common to many sports and occupations. They often occur between the third and fourth toes and cause pain, a burning sensation, tingling or numbness between the toes and the ball of the foot. It should be noted that trauma can also cause damage to nerves resulting in inflammation or swelling of the nerve.

STRESS FRACTURES
While tendons and muscles bend and stretch, your bones are rigid. When especially young athletes place constant stress on their bones, this injury can occur. A stress fracture is a small crack in the bone brought on by repeated direct stress to a particular spot.

FIFTH METATARSAL FRACTURE
Dancer’s Fracture or fifth metatarsal fracture is often the result of landing awkwardly on the outside portion of the foot or twisting the ankle.

METATARSAL FRACTURES
These are breaks in the long bones that lead up to the toes can occur simply by an opponent or another player stepping on a player’s foot.

SESAMOIDITIS
Sesamoiditis is an inflammation of the sesamoid bones in the ball of the foot and the tendons they are embedded in. It’s usually caused by overuse, especially by dancers, runners and athletes who frequently bear weight on the balls of their feet.

HIGH ANKLE SPRAINS
When an athlete rolls his or her ankle, the resulting injury is called an inversion sprain. Another type of sprain is known as a high ankle sprain which are common to hockey players. These injuries occur slightly above the ankle to the tendons that attach the lower leg bones (tibia and fibula) to the ankle. Typically, this happens when the skate blade catches a rut and the ankle rolls inside to outside (eversion). Pain often becomes worse when you flex your foot upward, such as when going up or down stairs. Unfortunately, high ankle sprains often take a while to heal—usually at least 6 weeks, and sometimes much longer.

LACE BITE
Lace bite is particular to hockey and is marked by pain that can stretch from the front of your lower leg and ankle to your toes, across the top of your foot. It’s usually the result of inflammation and aggravation of the tendon that connects your tibia to your big toe. This tendon is important for dorsiflexion which simply means pulling the front of your foot up toward your leg. When severe, taking strides or simply putting your skate on can be extremely painful to unbearable. Most of the time, the problem is that the tongue of the skate is pressing too tightly against the tendon, which can be deeply aggravating as you try to skate around a rink.

SHIN SPLINTS
Shin splints is an inflammation of the muscles, tendons, and bone tissue around the large bone in your lower leg (tibia) which is commonly known as the shinbone. The pain typically occurs toward the inner front of the bone between the knee and ankle where muscles attach to the bone. Shin splints frequently affect athletes who regularly engage in moderate to heavy physical activity in sports such as tennis, racquetball, soccer or basketball. Pain can be so severe that all sports activity must be halted.